The IDEAL Investor Show: The Path to Early Retirement

Episode 58: Investing in Coffee ☕️ with the Director of Investor Relations with Josh Ziegelbaum

November 16, 2022 Axel Meierhoefer Season 1 Episode 55
Episode 58: Investing in Coffee ☕️ with the Director of Investor Relations with Josh Ziegelbaum
The IDEAL Investor Show: The Path to Early Retirement
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The IDEAL Investor Show: The Path to Early Retirement
Episode 58: Investing in Coffee ☕️ with the Director of Investor Relations with Josh Ziegelbaum
Nov 16, 2022 Season 1 Episode 55
Axel Meierhoefer

More on YouTube? Check the video version on Youtube

Who is the Guest?

Josh Ziegelbaum is the Director of Investor Relations at Legacy Group. Josh is responsible for managing investor communications, onboarding, and individual and commercial clients, as well as overall support of company initiatives. The dynamic work experience Josh has gained throughout his career gives him a unique perspective on both sales and operations.


Visit Him at:  

Website:  https://legacy-group.co/

Linkedin:https://www.linkedin.com/in/josh-ziegelbaum-85a01270/

Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/legacygroupinvestments/


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Show Notes Transcript

More on YouTube? Check the video version on Youtube

Who is the Guest?

Josh Ziegelbaum is the Director of Investor Relations at Legacy Group. Josh is responsible for managing investor communications, onboarding, and individual and commercial clients, as well as overall support of company initiatives. The dynamic work experience Josh has gained throughout his career gives him a unique perspective on both sales and operations.


Visit Him at:  

Website:  https://legacy-group.co/

Linkedin:https://www.linkedin.com/in/josh-ziegelbaum-85a01270/

Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/legacygroupinvestments/


Start taking action right NOW!

Connect with us through social! We’d love to build a community of like-minded people like YOU!

Support the Show.

Axel Meierhoefer:

Hey, have you ever asked yourself, where does the coffee that you have when you actually buy a pound of coffee actually come from? If you're looking at the packaging, you will see that there are particular regions in the world where growing coffee is basically perfect the right attitude, the right humidity, the right climate conditions. And in our guest today, Josh Siegel, Bob is actually gonna help us understand why it is such a good opportunity, on the one hand to grow coffee in Colombia. But for us as investors, how we can diversify in what's called agriculture investing, to figure out how can we make profits and income from investments that are outside of real estate, but related because you need a piece of land to put the trees on and then an operation to collect the coffee and turn it into coffee that can be sold. So you own part of the company that actually has those operations. And it is an additional thing that we can do to build our successful passive income, real estate investment portfolio that we're always talking about. So I hope you lean back, you're listening in and you learn a little bit how international investing in some other assets like coffee can be done and how it will look like. Hello, and welcome to another episode of The IDEAL Investor Show today, we're gonna go international, and we have an awesome guest to do that with. And that is Josh, so you gotta bomb. And he is going to tell us about green coffee and the Green Coffee Company and what they're doing there. So Josh, welcome to the show.

Josh:

Axel, thanks for having me on the show. It's great to be here with you. Yeah, awesome.

Axel Meierhoefer:

So I mean, I know that you have done a lot of things. You're the director of Investor Relations at Legacy group. So how did you get into that? And what's the story to just kind of get a little bit of an idea who is Josh?

Josh:

Yeah, let me take a kind of back to the beginning. Axel So I was born and raised in central New Jersey. I studied economics in college and out of school, I started working in financial services. So my first foray was an insurance. And then I transitioned over into banking. So I spent six years at Wells Fargo and Wells Fargo advisors. And my last role there was as a private banker, I was serving high net worth individuals and business owners in central New Jersey, helping them do full balance sheet banking. And that brought me down to South Florida back in 2018, I took a lateral transfer. And I took a role in Miami Beach and Surfside doing a similar function. But I would say with a higher caliber of clients. And I did that for some time before I found the partners who I work with today legacy group. And about two and a half years ago, I started in private equity, first as a VP of Business Development and capital raising kind of spearheading capital raise for green coffee companies earlier rounds, and also some syndicated Real Estate projects. And then for the last, let's call it year and a half, I've been the director of Investor Relations at Legacy group, we have 300 investors of high net worth individuals. So the experience that I had in the bank really carries over, but we're working in private assets. Of course, that's kind of what brought me into the space, I was always passionate about alternative investments about real estate, helping clients succeed financially and happy that I'm able to do all of that here and my role as director of Investor Relations at Legacy group.

Axel Meierhoefer:

All right, yeah. Very cool. And thanks for explaining that. Now. When you say high net worth individuals that might, you know, scare some people in the audience. Can you go a little bit and describe, okay, do people need to be accredited or can non accredited people invest. And just to put that a little bit into perspective, what that actually means?

Unknown:

Of course. So the definition at the bank, when I was serving the high net worth clients would be your relationships at the Bank of 250,000. And up to that could be deposits and investment balances. When we talk about that at Legacy group. And in private equity. It would be accredited investors that I'm referring to. So people who have a net worth north at a million dollars or more excluding their primary residence, or that are high income, they'll make 200,000 a year of single or 300,000 a year if married. So high net worth individuals and in reference to what we do at Legacy group would be accredited investors, our investment offerings are set up in a way that we're able to accept capital from accredited investors only. But that doesn't mean that I wouldn't be open to speaking to any of your audience and sharing more about what we do. But yes, to participate in our investments, we would have to verify that you meet the definition of an accredited investor.

Axel Meierhoefer:

Okay, yeah, that's very cool. And I think for most people, unless they have been in investing, and especially the value asset investing that we are proposing for our clients, I would think it is most likely that the income side would be met. But a lot of people and I'm always uncomfortable answering this, because I'm not a banker or investment advisor or anything like that. Because there's obviously especially living here in California, huge difference between your gross income and what you actually get into your checking account. So could you just for a moment, say, you know how that actually counts?

Josh:

Yeah, it would have to be income as shown on your tax return. So let's say you're self employed person, and you do 400 A year gross, but you have 350,000. In business expenses, kind of as far as SEC is concerned, you have 50,000 a year in income. So it would have to be AGI or adjusted gross income on tax returns.

Axel Meierhoefer:

That's a great point. I actually, I don't know if you've ever heard that Josh but, I call that the dance. Because I know that we have a whole bunch of people who have either on the side a small business or full time run a small business and why I call it a dance. This is actually from lender in Texas many, many years ago, because she basically in a totally different context taught me that one of the things to review, you know, if they would actually provide the loan was, you know, what is the income? And what are the expenses and life expenses and stuff like that? And I said, Well, you know, I have two businesses, and I have what I believe is a really good CPA, and the one thing that I'm telling him, kinda like, around this time of the year, like, you know, September, October, I'm telling him, hey, man, you know what your task is right? Like, so we made a good amount of money. So when it comes around to Texas, be creative to find ways so that we don't have to pay much, if anything, which always leads to AGI being significantly lower, not in the sense of going outside of the boundaries of the roads. But obviously, I mean, if you can avoid having to pay a lot of the taxes out of the gross income, then that's desirable. And she said to me, yeah, we call that the dance, because on the one hand, you don't want to pay a lot of taxes. But if you want to work with the Josh's of the world, then you have to find a middle ground, because if your CPA is too good, and like you just said you make 400, but you only have AGI of 50,000. Obviously, you pay almost no tax, where you can get a coffee. So that's, I think, something to realize, and especially for business owners, I think the really good guideline that I've developed for myself and always tell my clients is think about a little bit more through the credibility lens, right? If you are successful small business owner with a half a million or more in revenue, would somebody really believe that all you're basically making is 50,000, right? If you call yourself the CEO or president of the company. So if you allow yourself to have a little more than that, which is probably more credible, then you also were getting into the ballpark easier and sooner for those kind of like off market accredited investor opportunities. Now, when we're talking about green company, or Green Coffee Company, I think it is important. And you know, I mean, just for the audience to know Josh and I have been in touch about Green Coffee Company for quite a while. But I had way before we ever met each other already committed to investments in coffee in Panama, and Belize, and cocoa and things like that. So we are very aligned in the thinking and the opportunity. But a lot of people say isn't Starbucks doing coffee? Why do we need another coffee company? Can you explore that a little bit and tell the audience what the opportunity is?

Unknown:

Sure, happy to do that. So what we have is a very unique investment offering. I mean, we're comparing it to Starbucks, that's really a retail heavy brand, where I'd say the main focus is on direct to consumer roasted coffee products, and even food and other beverages. At Green Coffee Company. We're a producer at origin. So our investors are investing in the farmland that produces the coffee and the processing facilities that break it down from a coffee cherry into a green bean or an unroasted get processed coffee. So what we do is we take or we deploy investor capital and into real assets in Colombia currently. So we're the largest coffee producer in the country of Colombia. As of today, we have over 6500 acres of land over 7 million trees in the ground coffee trees that is, and we're on track to do over 13 million in revenue this year with an expectation of that to grow north of 250 million by 2026. What does that mean, and why is it important? So investors are investing with us in an early stage company. That's, I'd say a bit further along than some other early stage investments is a Series C round that we just opened in the last couple of weeks here. And they're owning all of the real assets and the production and it's a fully vertically integrated business from the farm all the way up to a wholesale manner. So we're not selling direct to consumer, we sell containers, b2b of unroasted coffee, and we have other verticals that we're working to build out as well. One would be the roasted coffee channel. So we want to take this at least a portion of the screen coffee and bring it through the US, we want to build a US based roaster targeting kind of Florida or Texas for that in the next couple of years. And then we also want to monetize the waste from coffee production are the byproducts so coffee, about 80% of it is waste, and only 20% is the coffee that we know that is the bean. So monetizing that waste, we're looking to build an alcohol brand of vodka brand out of that. And so it's very different than at Starbucks, that's a late stage blue chip, multibillion dollar company, our valuation is sub 100 million with almost all assets to back it. So the goal here is to continue to roll up the company build additional verticals, and we want to bring it public, that's actually our planned exit strategy, we're expecting in 2026, that we'll be in a position in order to tap into public markets and realize an exit for our investors, we're targeting an 11x net return on investment, or an IRR north of 60%, on an annualized basis through 2026. Now, while that's a forecast, if you compare that to maybe the analyst price targets of Starbucks over the next 1224 months, you'll notice a very strong divergence in the to at least send a return profile and what investors could expect. So we believe that we have the ability to make investors, life changing returns on investment, whereas not that I'm knocking on blue chip investments such as Starbucks, but as a much more later stage conservative approach to investing more of that plain vanilla type of strategy that you can get through banks and or even do it on your own in a self directed manner. It's kind of an overview of what we're doing and why it's different. And it's really a real asset balance sheet business focused on land and infrastructure, as opposed to a direct retail brand.

Axel Meierhoefer:

Okay, yeah, thank you. And that was a great explanation together a little bit of a comparison to what people are maybe more familiar with, or what comes to mind when they think in coffee. Now, if I look at my investment that I mentioned earlier, I literally am like a tidal partial owner of a farm. Right on actually, in my case, several farms over the years. Can you describe a little bit? What would an investor who says, Wow, this sounds really cool, and the opportunity internal rate of return the longer term game, and I think everybody understands, I mean, you grow coffee on trees, and the trees are there, I think, like, what, 20 years about something like that, in a rotating way to keep the production going. So you know, like, the first trees probably start getting replaced, like 1516 years old, and then you keep doing that to always have like, some younger, middle and older ones producing. But fundamentally, what would an investor actually be invested in? Are they getting shares? Are they getting pieces of land? Are they owning trees with their name on it? Or what is the actual part that people own?

Josh:

That's a great question Axel. And I am familiar with the structure that you're mentioning with parceled ownership, where you have the rights to the cash flow from that specific parcel. And it's a cash flow investment for sure, in which you would own, you know, an acre or several acres. And then, based on how much is produced there, the asset manager will distribute cash flows to you as an investor, which I'm not knocking that strategy, there's certainly a place for that in some people's portfolios. But what's different about ours is that investors own common equity in a US based holding company that owns all of the farmland, all of the facilities has rights to all future cash flows, and they own a percentage of that entire company. So think of that is open, investing in like a US corporate, where you would be a shareholder in a company, and then based on the profits of that entire company, you would be entitled to that as a shareholder. So it's a full umbrella of assets, as opposed to one parcel or one tree or dozen trees, with investors names on it as a shareholder. For those of you who are listening, you would own a percentage of the entire operation. And this is a percentage of an early stage business. So it's an operating business as opposed to just an asset. And that operating business owns the assets.

Axel Meierhoefer:

Right, exactly why and that would, I would assume that also owners of those shares are allowed to vote.

Josh:

It would be non voting shares. Now,

Axel Meierhoefer:

That's an important thing. I'm bringing this up because I totally different thing, but I read a report the other day, I think yesterday or the day before where they said that Porsche is going to go IPO. And then I read it a little further and it said well, but other shares are non voting because the family that owns like 50 or 60% of If the company don't want anybody else, tell them how to run it. So I think it's an important question. But on the other hand, I mean, I think there are very few listeners in our show that would actually claim that they could run a coffee company better than the experts, right? And so I think we don't need to necessarily get hung up. Now, what makes Colombia where you are basically building this a good place to grow and build this company and build this operation? Because again, and I don't mean to be mean, but I can imagine that people say, okay, haven't I heard something about Colombia? And remember, there was some things that weren't so stellar. So sure you get those questions, too? Can you say a little bit, I've actually, by the way, just full disclosure, I've been invited to do some leadership consulting projects in Cali. And I loved it. To be honest, if somebody were to, say, go again and do the same thing, I would immediately do that. So I have, I'm a fan. Let's put it that way. But not everybody knows much about what has happened in the last, let's say, 10 years in Colombia. So maybe you can say a little bit about that?

Josh:

Sure, I'd be happy to do that Axel. So we're very bullish on Colombia, and on the future of Colombia. And what you see on the ground there, it's very different from what's portrayed by the media. And I can tell you that firsthand going there, I feel very safe, even more safe than I do in certain parts of Fort Lauderdale, where I live here. So every city in every country has its issues, right. But on a macro economic basis, Colombia is very much open for business, I would call it probably the most capitalistic nation in Latin America today, as it relates to coffee. It's the national product of the country there and everyone knows Colombia for its coffee. And it's an area that we see is ripe for opportunity and ripe for disruption. So the way that business is typically done is in a relatively informal manner. It's landholdings that have been passed down from generations. And it's smaller landholding, families scattered throughout different regions. So what we're doing is we're consolidating that, and we're really rolling up assets into a very large enterprise on behalf of our investors. And we're really changing the way and innovating traditional coffee practices. So here in the US, a lot of industries, there's not coffee production. But other industries here are very advanced, very sophisticated with tons of competition. And we see down where we operate in meta gene and in cell gar, where the farms are located, a very strong labor pool and a very good work ethic out of the people. They're very, you know, engaged on the day to day in terms of operations. But we're not competing with large multinational corporations, or other private equity firms that are trying to do the same, I'd say we're very unique in that regard. And we have a US management team at Legacy group. So two partners, one was a former CPA who focused on mergers and acquisitions on a global level. The other is sec attorney or former SEC attorney, that will be Adam, Jason. And we believe we have the right team to execute in that market. So I would say there's a lot of arbitrage like return profiles that can be realized, which you wouldn't be able to achieve here in the US. I mentioned to you that we're the largest coffee producer in Colombia, we did that with 35 million in investor capital and our own capital, which with 35 million, you can't revolutionize an industry in the United States.

Axel Meierhoefer:

Yeah, and say, I mean, I'm not trying to make it sound like I'm an expert in coffee or anything like that. But I know from when we were still living in Europe, that you know, there were when you talk a little bit higher level than on coffee, they were like Arabica and Colombian and a few other names like that were basically known as, like regions of origin, so to speak, for their coffee. And I would say there was a phase, I don't even know exactly how many decades, but there was this phase, where Colombia with drugs and other things went down, kinda like in the wrong direction, and maybe didn't have a real understanding of what the consequences of that were. But one thing I wanted to point out since I mentioned that I visited myself, and I talked to the people, you know, like there was were people in management roles for large American and global companies that were looking to learn a little bit about the Western ways of leading companies and leading divisions and stuff like that. And in those conversations, which I what I thought really amazing is this wrong path that they had for a while, was so violent, according to the stories that I was told that a lot of parents had had at least a little bit of money from previous times, or some assets or stuff like that. used to send their kids out into the world, to live with relatives or to just go to school somewhere in the world and live somewhere where the risk of them being kidnapped and somehow pulled into this old rack more or less, was basically non existent or very low. And what I thought was really amazing was that when the whole system changed, and they became basically democratic, and they elected a president and established a constitution and all those things, a lot of these people felt, okay, I want to go home, right. And they were like in their 20s, maybe even like late teens, early 20s, up to maybe 30. And when I was there, and admittedly, this is already, probably five, six years ago, there was this energy of all these people coming home, bringing what they learned in school, at universities, working at companies into the country. And both like from an energy point, but also language diversity. I was totally blown away how many different languages these different people were speaking, but they had basically been dispersed all over the world. And now they came back home to help the country come back on its feet. And I think that is probably shown to some extent when you said we have an amazing labor pool. Because for me, I'd never heard about that families go to that extreme to say, I'm sending my kids out somewhere into the world where it's safe, relatively young. Right. So I thought that was a really cool story. Now, we come back to the actual investment opportunity, and I promised you that we keep it within the given timeframe. If somebody were to say, Okay, well, I like coffee. I like the story. I like the opportunity. I rather than buying Starbucks stock, I rather work with Josh, how would they actually go about this process? What would be the steps assuming somebody is an accredited investor?

Unknown:

Thanks, Axel. So I'd say find us on our website and reach out to us by email, subscribe to our email newsletter so that you can stay updated on investment opportunities through Green Coffee Company and legacy group. So you could send us an email at Investor dot relations at Legacy hyphen group.co, or visit us on our website at Legacy hyphen group.co. On our site, you can subscribe to our newsletter, or if you send me an email, I'd be happy to do so on your behalf. We can also set up a call to speak individually, obviously, listening to the two of us talk here on a higher level. But we'd love to engage with anyone that would want more information, either through email or through scheduled calls. So getting in touch with us would be the best first course of action. And then we can provide additional information on the investment offering we could share access to our deal room or investor materials. And if today is not a right time, but you just want to stay informed being on our newsletter would be the next best bet, I'd say

Axel Meierhoefer:

Yeah, and I am actually even though I'm currently not investing in more different coffee, but I think it's a great way because you guys do a really good job helping people understand what the progress is. Now, obviously, all those links and stuff like that will go in the show notes. You mentioned at the very beginning, and I wanted to just make sure that, you know, we have basically something that has kind of like longevity when it comes out and people that are listening to us about this recording. You said we're in a seed round right now and we're raising X amount of money. Is this basically something where you would say okay, if you're not within the fill in the blanks, amount of time commit, the opportunity is gone? Or can you say maybe a word or two, if people say, Well, you know, towards the end of the year is tricky. But maybe early next year, I could maybe do something? How does this plan look like? How much longer will people have the opportunity to become a part of it?

Josh:

It's a great question. So as of the time of this recording, we're kind of mid to late September, we open the Series C funding round in early September, it's a $25 million equity raise, I would expect that it would take us about three to six months to fill that out based on past experience in our last rounds and the momentum that we have. So by the time of this recording is released, I would expect that we still have an allocation available. If not, we would love to still connect with you and also can keep you updated on future opportunities. It would be on a first come first serve basis. So there's no drop dead cut off date on when this offering will be closed. It would be once it's fully subscribed by our investors and by new investors. And we have divided that $25 million capital raise into three tranches. So we're offering discounts on share price for earlier investors. So the first third or 8 million that comes in, we're offering a seven and a half percent share price discount, and then we're offering another discount on the next tranche and then the final tranche would be at base price still, regardless of which tranche it is. It's a great return profile just slightly higher for the earlier investors. But definitely by the time this is released, or if you hear it after, we'd still love to get in touch with you and kind of let you know where we're at, at least from a funding perspective and what opportunities we see.

Axel Meierhoefer:

Yeah, and I mean, when I looked at the website, it said You know, you have more than I think you mentioned it to more than 6000 acres of land was more than what is it 7 million trees or something like that. Now I'm assuming that the money that is being raised is going into some of that and building it out. Is there a point where you would say, Okay, we're looking to reach this particular size? And then we're probably done with funding routes and then just make money from operations? Or is there way more growth potential in the future?

Josh:

Let me answer both those questions or so. So the goal with this capital would be like you said, additional farmland acquisitions as one portion. So that would be in Sagar where we currently operate. And also in another region we're targeting can do, it's a region in Colombia that has an opposite heart primary harvest. So the reason for acquiring land there would be that we have year round production. So a nice chunk of this capital raised will be geared towards farmland acquisitions, and further infrastructure or processing facilities. Another use of proceeds, which is another pillar of ours would be that roasting channel. So we're expecting to deploy significant amount into US based roaster. And then finally, the byproduct initiative, which would be the build out of alcohol distillery in order to distill the byproduct into another. So those would be the use of proceeds for the funding round. It's a $25 million equity raise, but it's actually $100 million funding round. So we've mapped out proceeds for 100 million, the equity round is being run concurrently with a $75 million debt financing round, which isn't for investors who are listening in it would be for institutional investors. So we're conducting that with local banks and Columbia institutional lenders. In terms of timelines and such Now you said, Oh, are we going to do another round? Or is this the end of it, we don't have another round currently planned beyond the Series C, we believe that this capital will get us into place that we want to be in order to get build out the business over the next couple of years and get it packaged and ready for IPO or sale, or dual tracking the company to be sold or to more preferably go public and US markets, we expect in 2026, we'll be able to achieve that. And that's with the capital that we are planning to use from this current round. So it's quite possible that the ambitions will grow as they have been, and then we would continue to expand beyond this. But at least in the short term, the Series C would be the only round that we have on the calendar.

Axel Meierhoefer:

Okay. Very cool. And I have two quick other things I wanted to touch on because you said the byproducts and one thing that I've seen, obviously, like I said from the start, I'm involved a little bit in similar investments is that some people have discovered that you can actually use the what I call the cherry meat to make tea. So I want to for our audience who are not coffee drinkers say okay, alcohol is one way to go. Have you considered maybe something like using it to address actually a name for it, but I forgot what it is to use the cherries for tea?

Josh:

Yeah, that product you're referring to is Cascara. That's the outside of the cherry or the waste. And that waste is what is then distilled or what will be distilled into an alcohol product, it would first actually go to ethanol, and then we will be using that ethanol to create other spirits, such as vodka. But there are other uses. And we're exploring other uses. And we're analyzing the content and the chemical makeup of this Cascara that we have, the distillery is being built out currently, we wouldn't expect it to be online and fully operational until call it ended 2023. But in the short term, we're going to have a tremendous amount of Cascara on our farms. So we will likely be selling that in a wholesale manner to someone else that would be using it for a tea or another product, it's quite possible that we might build that out on our own. But at least the main focus for us is on ethanol and or spirits. But we can definitely look to sell the extra cost go out to other end users that might use it for tea or for other.

Axel Meierhoefer:

That's really cool. And I mean, if you were to just think the ethanol additive without refining it further, I know of, for example, an organization in the Santa Cruz area that is actually using the ethanol to basically as a fuel to run industrial operations for other things because it's not fossil based, right. So there are different ways and thoughts that can go in. I think they're using it to heat and random machinery for like farming operations in greenhouses and stuff. So all kinds of cool things to do. So I think we get a pretty good idea. And I want to thank you, Josh, for giving us this, you know, what are the different opportunities and what's the plan and where is it going? One thing that is completely unrelated to coffee or could be unrelated to coffee is the last question I asked everybody. And that is if you had a time machine Josh, you could go forward backward any way you wanted to, you know, everything you know, you can come back, the only thing you're not allowed to do is change the space time continuum, I say always said it started. Where would you go and why?

Unknown:

I'm very interested in the future beyond my lifetime. And I'm very excited to see as much as I'll be able to see in the decades to come or at least what I hope to be decades to come But I would love to see from an innovation standpoint where the human race is going hundreds of years from now, even 1000s of years from now, I'm very intrigued with space travel technology, unrelated to coffee and certain aspects. But that really drives me and you know, I like to do right by my investors and by society, because I believe we all have a role to play in the continuous growth of the human race. But I would love to go into the future and see it and no specific time period. So call it 100 years and even 1000 and beyond. But if I can have a lens into the future and see where we're going, I would just that's really interesting to me on an individual basis, not even for investments and like figuring out where the next big thing is, but just really seeing where, where we are going as collectively.

Axel Meierhoefer:

Yeah, I've actually, I've been kind of chuckling a little bit, because in recent interviews with Elon Musk, when they asked him, you know, what are you doing this for? And under better things to do with your money than here on Earth and stuff? And he always used to answer well, I think it's important that the human race becomes interplanetary. But recently, in more recent interviews, he says, well, and then when we got there, or at least close to it, we need to become Interstellar. So when you come back, you're gonna tell us, we are no good. We made it to Interstellar, or if we got stuck on mass or something like that,

Josh:

I'd expect that we're gonna get there. So that's kind of why I would I would love to see where it's going and how far we would go,

Axel Meierhoefer:

There will be an additional show where you and I could basically talk a little bit about you know, when human the overall capacity of the human race would be freed from labor, which AGI artificial general intelligence could be coming in, and not even too distant future? How much creative things couldn't we come up with, you know what to do, and places to go and things to develop, and so forth. So that's maybe when we come back together, Josh, and philosophy podcast about where's the human race going in the next couple 100 years? Well, that being said, I want to step in and say one more time tell people how they can get in touch with you if they want to know more, or invest in the Green Coffee Company.

Unknown:

Yes. So you can find us on our website at Legacy-group.co, you can send us an email at Investor dot relations at Legacy hyphen, group.co. And we'd love to get in touch with you.

Axel Meierhoefer:

Awesome. And thank you again, for making the time, Josh, because I think this is somewhat unique, and a place that people may not necessarily be looking for. But you guys have achieved so much already that you know, it's kind of the right time, I think for people who want to do something a little bit more creative with their money. So thank you for being on the show. And thank you. Thanks for listening. And I hope you enjoyed today's episode of The IDEAL Investor Show more info and the links we mentioned during the show in the show notes or you can go to our website at idea where to go.com and sign up for the Apple podcast link. And if you'd like to talk to me sign up for a strategy call. Hopefully you want to share what you learned with your network and bring more people in we are really eager to hear your comments and until next time, be well stay safe and ciao.